Owen Murdock, a third grade student, did an experiment during the recent science class project that focused on the different characteristics of magnets and how they work.
Owen Murdock, a third grade student, did an experiment during the recent science class project that focused on the different characteristics of magnets and how they work.
GALENA-Why do magnets repel each other sometimes? Why are some objects attracted to magnets and others are not?

The third graders of Tri-State Christian School have been learning all about it in their science class as they study the different characteristics of magnets and how they work.

The students were able to experiment with magnets and see how the magnets can attract and repel each other. They were also able to see and feel the force a magnet has when certain objects enter its magnetic field. Students learned that a magnet can be made to stick to objects which contain magnetic material such as iron, even if they are not magnets. Students saw firsthand that a magnet cannot be made to stick to materials which are plastic, or cotton, or any other material, such as wood, which is not magnetic. They learned that the magnetic field is so strong it causes large clusters of the irons atoms to line up with each other. The clusters of aligned atoms are called Magnetic Domains. Each domain that is perfectly magnetized is made up of millions of aligned atoms.